BUFFALO, N.Y. (WIVB) — The Republican candidates for State Attorney General and Comptroller made a campaign stop in Buffalo, criticizing their opponents’ records on fighting corruption, as they discussed what they’re calling New York’s “corruption tax.”

Attorney General candidate Michael Henry, and fellow Republican Paul Rodriguez, who is running for State Comptroller, criticized what they called New York’s “Culture of Corruption,” which they say is what happens when one party controls state government.

“All of this corruption has a cost and every New Yorker pays a corruption tax,” Rodriguez said.

Without pointing fingers at who is causing the corruption, Republicans Paul Rodrguez and Michael Henry accused their political rivals of doing little to stop it. Henry is the endorsed challenger taking on Democrat Attorney General Letitia James, and Rodriguez is taking on State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli.

Rodriguez said DiNapoli is known as a nice guy, but New Yorkers need something better.

“He is very willing to go after petty corruption — a local clerk, an elections official, $10,000 here and there,” Rodriguez said. “But when it really comes to going up against real power, he is very hesitant, he is tepid about it.”

Michael Henry is a lawyer from Queens, challenging Democrat Letitia James, the incumbent Attorney General. Henry zeroed in on the central figure in former Lieutenant Governor Brian Benjamin’s indictment, Harlem businessman Gerald Migdol, who has donated thousands of dollars to various political campaigns — including James’.

James has returned Migdol’s donations and given most of the money to charity, but Henry says James should have been watching out for taxpayers.

“It is alarming that the Attorney General of this state did nothing when the reports of corruption emerged,” Henry said. “She did not investigate, the Attorney General did not call for investigations when first press reports of this corruption emerged.”

A spokesperson for AG Letitia James told us, they have had to correct some of Michael Henry’s facts over the last couple of days, but all of the questionable donations have been given up. A DiNapoli spokesperson told us he has instituted a number of anti-corruption measures since 2011.

Al Vaughters is an award-winning investigative reporter who has been part of the News 4 team since 1994. See more of his work here. To submit a Call 4 Action, click here.